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in the united states senate. he can start by putting americans to work by aproviding the keystone pipeline. he could do something about sky high gas prices by increasing american energy production and he could empower small businesses by cutting red tape and reempleg the regulatory process. he could deal with our crippling debt by encouraging democrats to pass a duj et. look, we want to work with the president, but it's about time that he gets serious, focused on jobs, focused on our economy and enough with the gimmicks. >>. [ inaudible ] >> doing a very good job. i do believe when it comes to fast and furious, we've got to get to the bottom of what happened and who's responsible. and the committee is doing that and i'm supporting their efforts. >> does that mean you are sea supporting -- he is in the process of right now writing a resolution you're supporting a resolution. >> i'm supporting in their efforts to hold those people in the department of justice accountable for what happened. the committee has work to do. they know what they have to do. they're pursuing a lot of unanswered question
. and the cold war is not done yet. it's not just the fall of china. it's not just the united states cozying up to japan. but it's going to explode the cold war is going to heat up if you will, in korea. now, remember the last lecture, world war ii? we talked about korea being occupied by japan. once the war is over, the united states and the soviet union decide to divide korea with the united states being in control of the southern part of korea, the soviet union is going to be administering the northern part of korea. eventually, both u.s. and ussr agree that we will withdraw and allow the koreans to have some degree of self-determination. we're going to pull out, soviet union's going to pull out. the koreans will be able to determine their future and their fate. and we both did. the difference is, when we pulled out, we basically took everything with us. when the soviet union pulled out, they left behind a stockpile of weapons. the most modern military technology that they had at the time, and that's the temptation that was going to be used the following summer, 1950, north korea with the us
's not just the united states cozying up to japan. it's going to explode the cold war and it will heat up in korea. now remember the last lecture of world war ii. we talked about korea being occupied by japan. once the war is over, the united states and the soviet union decide to divide korea with the united states being in control of the southern part of korea and the sev yet union is going to be administering the northern part of korea. eventually both u.s. and uss r agree we will withdraw and allow them to have a degree of self determination. we are going pull out and the soviet union will and the koreans will be able to determine their future and fate. we both did. the difference is when we pulled out, we took everything with us. when the soviet union pulled out, they left a stockpile of weapons. the most mot earn technology they had at the time. that's a temptation that was going to be used. the following summer with the use of soviet military armaments, they will innovate and try to take possession of the country. this is what they had warned us about. they are going to expand into
, it david miliband, a former u.k. ambassador to the united states, and my former british colleague at nato. we have widespread support for this report. we are very grateful for their intellectual import and personal support, so that is what i wanted to say. at the order is for us to have a brief conversation, and then we will be happy to take whatever questions you have. thank you. [applause] >> thank you very much for that. first of all, it is important to state that the atlantic council as a council does not take a point of view on anything, because it would just be too hard to get all of the members to agree, but i do think one thing we all agree on is a strong alliance and an enduring alliance, and this report points us in that direction. let me ask probably just two questions, and i will go to the audience right away, and two of the more controversial points, clearly, what you're saying on germany is tough, and it is saying it to a germany where many germans would argue, are we not doing the most important thing we could possibly do for the future of europe right now, which is aiding
ended in 2009 but most did not feel it but people in all three states feel the united states should get out of afghanistan by a 2-1 margin. but most approve of the job that obama is doing there. a gender gap is on display. it is too close to call in florida where the president is down but it is 13 points in ohio. and he has a 17-point edge among women in pennsylvania. >>reporter: thank you on the perfect strange day in washington, dc. another former aide to john edwards on the witness stand today. he said he overher the foam presidential candidate asking his mistress whether her baby bump was showing. the foam aide here in the blue tie and glasses said in 26 fix he saw the mistress get off the elevator on the same floor as john edwards and the foam aide says the mistress told him she and john edwards were madly if love. and the next day the aide says john edwards called him to deny he was having an affair and told him rielle hunter was crazy. not long after that run in the aide said campaign staffers had to stay in a different hotel floor from the presidential candidate, but one day in
was in germany on official business. and shortly after general wheeler returned to the united states he suffered a heart attack, and was in walter reed. the only two chiefs who were asked about this dismissed it, one in very crude terms, and wheeler later told the president that there had never been such a meeting. so that is about as far as i can go with that controversial story. as secretary brown alluded to, we associate this period with mcnamara, and with vietnam. but mcnamara's involvement in a whole series of other crises, both foreign and domestic, is simply remarkable. we've heard about the dominican republic, the nato crisis, the middle east war, czechoslovakian invasion, demonstrations in the streets of the united states. any one of these crises could have defined a presidency. for example, if we look at president jimmy carter's administration, it involved notable successes, but it's best remembered for the iranian hostage issue. when the iranians took over the american embassy in tehran, and then held hostage americans for more than a year. think about mcnamara. in january 1968, the n
>>> 30 minutes from now the president of the united states will address the american people. >> welcome to cnn's breaking news coverage of president obama's surprise visit to afghanistan. the president will be telling us about the new strategic partnership agreement he has just signed with afghanistan's president outlining the relationship between the united states and afghanistan after the withdrawal of u.s. forces at the end of 2014. white house officials tell us the timing was driven by the negotiations over that agreement at an upcoming nato summit. critics will say it is about politics. everyone knows today is the anniversary of the raid in pakistan that killed osama bin laden. on the ground, do people there -- are they aware that president obama is on the ground? >> reporter: late in the afternoon the sun went down there was a report on afghan media suggesting that he was already in kabul. since then we have seen absolute silence across the city occasionally by helicopters and that is presumably some part of the president in and out of the capital. the speech we are ab
for the united states and europe. i might add is also a great pleasure to see the french ambassador here this afternoon. thank you for the support that you gave 2 brookings, and that your predecessors gave to fiona hill, was -- and she would be addressing you from this lectern at the date of this conference, but she was locked into a commitment in beijing. but i want to assure you on behalf of brookings and the united states and europe that this does not represent a strategic pivot on the part of the institution or the center to east asia. it has been our pleasure, and i hope of some contribution to the policy community in partnership with the heinrich boll's foundation to bring the conference to you on an annual basis. and i think it is particularly appropriate that we should have filled with us today. -- phil with us today. he is secretary of state of european affairs and is responsible for u.s. policy toward about 50 countries, as well as three key -- and i would add to that currently, someone challenged international institutions -- the north of montreal organization, the european u
will be flying to berlin. and a few days later, he will become to the united states to attend the g-8 summit hosted by president barack obama at camp david. and that will also be very important international test that president hollande will be facing very soon in his presidency. >> we're talking about europe's challenge to austerity. independents 202-628-0205. if you're calling from outside the united states today, we hope that you will, 202-628-0184. as always, we'll be taking your tweets, looking at your e-mails and the conversation continues on facebook. our first call comes from spokane, washington. mary on our line for republicans. you're on "the washington journal." go ahead. >> ye >>. >> caller: yeah, here in the united states, we have the same issues you're having over there, but your countries always seem more on the ball to listen to the people. and i was wondering why -- i always suggested how come you guys go to the people and ask their opinion or like i suggested here in the state, there's a lot of people in the united states that are intelligent. they just can't physically wor
in the time i have been here. the french socialists are not strangers for the united states. they shouldn't be strangers. it has been true that it has been 17 years since the socialists were in power at the presidency. of course, they ran the government about a decade ago when spauo was in power. we have always had a very good relationship with any government that is there in france. i am confident we will have a good relationship with this government in france. we do have to see how this government is going to deal with the issues of the day. it's one thing to be campaigning. it is always something different to be governing. it is not me. it is not my job to predict how this will evolve. i will note that francoi francois hollande campaigned to keep france in the military structure. that was a remarkable statement after nicolas sarkozy to come back into the structure. i think france learned in the libya operation that being integrated in the command structure gives you a voice and say over what happens in the internal affairs of the military operation. that's important. you learn there ar
that has helped expedite this thing with terrorism and their attacks on the united states? is it one person or many? who is responsible? >> i don't think there's a nickel's worth of difference between the two policies in terms of foreign policy. the first president bush, mr. clinton, the sec and mr. bush and mr. obama have made it their business to light to the american people, to insist we are being attacked because of what we think here in north america or how we lived rather than with united states government has done. the core of the problem is intervention in other people's business. part of that intervention is unfortunately necessary. we have to defend the saudis and operate because we depend on oil. our support of israel and our intervention in south sudan, the relentless intervention of the united states on issues that are not very important to it is because of what is going on and it is a bipartisan stimulus. it's not just one person. until we stop that war think about stopping at, there is no chance to stop this war and that is why so much about kite has spread so greatly since 2
of international waters. 162 countries and the european community have ratified the treaty but the united states is not to read to the secretary of state hillary clinton and defense secretary leon panetta urged the senate to approve the treaty setting national security, job creation and oil exploration. they testified at the senate foreign relations committee. it's just under three hours. >> the hearing will come to order. thank you all very much for being with us today. secretary clinton, secretary panetta and general dempsey, welcome, we are privileged to have you here today. we thank you for joining us. it's a rare occasion in any committee but in this committee when we have simultaneously a panel of witnesses that brings together americans top diplomat, our country's top descends official and our nation's top military officer. your presence here altogether powerfully underscores the importance that you put on this issue. our committee shares the sense of importance which is why i hope without respect to party or ideology we begin an open, honest and comprehensive discussion about whether the
in history the united states needs latin america more than latin america needs the united states? now comcast your mind back -- cast your mind back to a decade ago, that question would seem absurd. the united states was the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world, the most powerful country economically, politically, militarily. why on earth would he need anyone, let alone a continent known for its economic crises, its political instability for having almost no global clout? well, how times have changed. and how used we have become to the fact of change. there's an old jewish joke i heard probably about 5000 times when i was growing up, and it's set in eastern europe in the 19 century in a period when borders were changing very rapidly. and the story goes that a woman is taking up washington in a remote area and the soldier rides up and he declares old woman, from this day forth, this man -- this land is no longer politically his imperial russian. she watches him go. thank god, i couldn't stand another polish winter. [laughter] thank you for laughing. i will pass those laughs on to my fat
the president of the united states turned out to be a dlib fabrication because for sduecury reasons he made a trip under the veil of secrecy. this is standard operating procedure for presidents visiting america's various war zones. shortly after the 2008 election in which he was elected president, after the election but before the new president had been sworn in in december of 2008, then still president george w. bush took one of these surprise trips the, unannounced trips to background. it was december 14th, 2008. that's when this happened. >> yes. everybody calm down for a minute. first of all, thank you for apologizing on behalf of the iraqi people. it doesn't bother me. if you want the facts, it's a size 10 shoe that he threw. >> boy, if you were not surprised enough to find out that the president had surprise, gone to iraq, the president having a shoe hurled at him was definitely a surprise that day. when you look at the official transcript from this, we posted a link to it on our blog tonight. when you go through the transcript of this event, when you get to the part where the guy thr
was in baghdad was to sign the agreement which committed the united states to end our war in iraq. it was an agreement that president obama then followed through on. the last u.s. troops left iraq in december. today, in afghanistan it was not a status of forces agreement. it was called a strategic partnership agreement between the u.s. and afghan government but the idea is the same. it's to commit both countries to a plan by which the united states will end our war there. >> today i signed an agreement between the united states and afghanistan that defines a new relationship between our countries. a future in which afghans are responsible for the security of their nation and we build an equal partnership between two states. as we move forward some people will ask why we need a firm timeline. the answer is clear. our goal is not to build a country in america's image or to eradicate the taliban. these objectives would require in many years, many more dollars and most importantly many more american lives. our goal is to destroy al qaeda and we on path to do exactly that. afghans want
that the president has landed safely in afghanistan, he flu there year night from the the united states. obviously he is there on the one year anniversary of the raid across the border in pakistan that led to the death of osama bin laden. we also know the president will address the nation tonight in the 7:00 hour, 7:30 p.m., he will address the nation from afghanistan. and we know while there he is scheduled to meet with the afghan president, hamid karzai and the two ledder leaders ared to sign a extstrategic agreemen between the two countries. this would create an alliance between the two countries essentially saying about this the years going forward when the u.s. combat troops are out of afghanistan, there would still be training and cooperation between the two countries. that has been morimportant to t united states to have a footprint in afghanistan going forward and as the country marks one year since the death of osama bin laden, there are still big questions about the security situation in afghanistan. you were talking about occasional problems with the taliban. and this is separate from the
the united states and europe remain each other's best parkhurst and that when the american president or european leader looks how the public and says pudu one call when there's a problem of the person on the other side of the cleantech. my judgment is that is not going to change anytime soon partly because of the affinity of interest of the values and also there aren't other options and even though there are emerging countries out your waist count on our european allies and to rely on our european allies more than we can count on a cost-cutting. at the same time i think it's clear that we are at the cusp of a major historic transition in the global landscape in which the world that nato represents his losing the primacy it enjoyed the last 200 years and if you look at the share of global product represented by nato and i would include japan because they are a part of the western world since world war ii we've gone from roughly 70% of the global product to 50% and we are headed towards 40% and that says to me the big security question of the day are about how we are going to manage th
home, bagram being a hub or many troops returning back to the united states and i think keen to try to suggest as he said a year ago the tide of war is still receding, choosing this anniversary, the death of bin laden, the man for americans the reason why they came to afghanistan, choosing the anniversary of his death to take this narrative an extra stage forwards and explaining exactly how america will tie up the loose ends of the decades-long war and how his presence will look like in the years ahead. >> nick what is the strategic partnership agreement? it doesn't talk about funding. those say this is more about, this isn't really, some saying kind of sets out the logistics of what's going to happen over the next ten years, after 2014. >> it's very strong on symbolism, not heavy on substance. it's important for america that it was signed, that it happened because for months there were outstanding issues that made it look like it may never come to fruition. it's important it was signed ahead of this vital summit in chicago in may, where nato allies have to put forward their contrib
i'm anderson cooper. we welcome our viewers across the united states and around the globe to the special report, president obama addressing the american people from afghanistan, talking about the future of u.s. troops there and we are going to bring that to you live. >> lots of news happening now, dramatic developments covering the president's surprise visit to afghanistan like no one else can. we have our reporters in afghanistan, in pakistan, in washington, in new york, we're watching all of this unfold, our own john king will give us an inside look at what it's like to be on a secret presidential trip to a war zone. he's been on one before, our own erin burnett looks at al qaeda's future and our christiane amanpour and fareed zakariazaka. >> the president took a helicopter to kabul and signed a strategic partnership agreement with president hamid karzai. it could mark the beginning of the end of the war there. listen. >> neither americans nor the afghan people asked for this war, yet for a decade we've stood together to drive al qaeda from its camps to battle an insurge
relations between the two countries. he will then make a televised speech to the united states, indeed to the entire world, in three and a half hours from now at 7:30 p.m. eastern time here in the united states. let's go straight to our white house correspondent brianna keilar. for this president, this is a huge deal. set the scene. >> reporter: this is a big deal, wolf. a trip by the president of the united states to a war zone like afghanistan is extraordinary and this is only the third time that president obama has made this trip. it's been over a year. the last time he was there was in december 2010 and furthermore, at the presidential palace which is where he is right now for brief remarks with president hamid karzai and to sign the strategic partnership agreement with afghanistan to talk about the u.s. relationship with afghanistan beyond 2014. that's extraordinary. the last time the president was in afghanistan in december of 2010 he could not make that trip from bagram air force base which is about 30 miles or so north of kabul to the palace because of weather concerns,
. it's to commit both countries to a plan by which the united states will end our war there. >> today i signed an agreement between the united states and afghanistan that defines a new relationship between our countries. a future in which afghans are responsible for the security of their nation and we build an equal partnership between two states. as we move forward some people will ask why we need a firm timeline. the answer is clear. our goal is not to build a country in america's image or to eradicate the taliban. these objectives would require in many years, many more dollars and most importantly many more american lives. our goal is to destroy al qaeda and we on path to do exactly that. afghans want to assert their sovereignty and build a lasting peace. the agreement we signed today sends a clear message to the afghan people. as you stand up, you will not stand alone. within this framework we'll work with the afghans to determine what support they need to accomplish two narrow security missions beyond 2014. counter terrorism, and continued training. we will not build permanent base
news. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> this is cnn breaking news. >> we're following the breaking news. dramatic developments. president obama's surprise trip to afghanistan exactly one year after the u.s. raid that killed osama bin laden in neighboring pakistan. less than an hour or so ago we got the first word of his arr e arrival at the bagram air base. he is now in kabul meeting with the afghan president hamid karzai to sign a long-term strategic partnership agreement at a rather precarious time for relations between the two countries. he will then make a televised speech to the united states, indeed to the entire world, in three and a half hours from now at 7:30 p.m. eastern time here in the united states. let's go straight to our white house correspondent brianna keilar. for this president, this is a huge deal. set the scene. >> reporter: this is a big deal, wolf. a trip by the president of the united states to a war zone like afghanistan is extraordinary and this is only the thi
the united states and afghanistan over the next decade. and will include sort of the outline for the withdrawal plan. we expect the president to address the nation and u.s. troops at 7:31 our time. that's a speech that will last for about 10 to 15 minutes, martin. and we will, of course, be carrying that live. president obama has arrived in afghanistan. he is meeting with afghanistan president hamid karzai. of course, this all comes on the one-year anniversary of the killing of osama bin laden. certainly this timing is not coincidental but president obama there to discuss the strategic partnership with the president of afghanistan, including the plan for withdrawal. >> and do you know anything or any detail yet about how this was carried out? because we knew absolutely nothing about it. the president clearly leaving the white house. i mean, i'm assuming that somebody must have known. what do we know about the detail of that? >> well, we know that of course, senior administration officials were aware of this plan. but the white house certainly keeping this a secret throughout
if you look at the successful record of immigrants to the united states, whether skilled or unskilled, documented or undocumented, across the last 200 years and particularly in the last 25 years and with the great renaissance of data that we now have at our disposal to analyze more clearly the impact of all types of immigration from 1990 forward, we realize that immigrants, again, skilled and unskilled, lawful and undocumented, bring to the effort of community building and business building and economy building something that is moderately intangible for now. if we work at it for a few more years it will be tangible and we will be able to quantify part of it. it's something that represents itself in generational achievement both for those immigrants who arrive, who form small businesses at a rate which is disproportionately higher than native-born citizens, for their children that in turn achieve at a level that is higher on average than the children of native-born citizens, not to disparage those who come from the united states or come from long lines of families that come from the u
in this field. september 11th hijackers used united states and foreign financial institutions to hold, move, and retrieve their money. they deposited money into united states accounts via wire transfers and depp sits of traveler's checks and cash that was brought from overseas. they kept funds in foreign accounts which they accessed through atmst and credit card transactions in the home land. according to the september 11th commission, the plot cost al qaeda somewhere in the range of $400,000 to $500,000, of which approximately $300,000 passed through the hijackers' bank casualties here in the united states. after the attacks, the united states publicly declared that the fight against al qaeda financing was as critical as the fight against al qaeda itself. the charge of the united states intelligence and law enforcement communities was clear -- if we choke off the terrorists' money, we limit their ability to conduct mass casualty attacks. within months of the attacks, the department of defense, the fbi, the cia, and perhaps most importantly the department of treasury launched a swift and un
that people take a look at peel's previous statements. the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden. >> we have breaking news at this very moment. we understand the president is in afghanistan. this on the first anniversary of the killing of osama bin laden. we understand that he traveled there overnight. there was something of a "meet the press" and media blackout but we are able to confirm the president is indeed in afghanistan. i'm joined now by kristen welker who is at the white house. please tell us what do you know? what have you heard? >> hi there. good afternoon to you. we can tell you that president obama arrived in afghanistan in kabul at 2:39 p.m. our time, which is 11:09 in afghanistan. right now, he is at the afghan presidential palace with president hamid karzai. we're just getting this information so i'll read it to you. he is there to sign the strategic partnership agreement which is essentially going to outline the relationship between the united states and afghanistan over the next decade. and will include sort of the outline for the wit
front of the u.s. capitol, this is half an hour. >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of united states. >> detail, colors. present arms. [silence] >> detail, color guard, right shoulder, order. arm. >> please stand for the assessment of the colors like united states capitol police, and remain standing for our national anthem. [silence] >> detail, color guar guard. present arms. >> we will now have the national anthem by kathy williams. ♪ oh, say, can you see ♪ by the dawn's early light ♪ what so proudly we hailed ♪ at the twilight's last gleaming? ♪ ♪ whose broad stripes and bright stars ♪ ♪ thro' the perilous fight ♪ o'er the ramparts we watched ♪ were so gallantly streaming t ♪ and the rockets red glare ♪ the bombs bursting in air ♪ gave proof through the night ♪ that our flag was still there ♪ ♪ oh, say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave ♪ ♪ o'er the land of the free ♪ and the home of the brave? >> detail, color guard. order, right shoulder, arms. >> please remain standing for the invocation. >> please join me in prayer. our gracious fathe
president of the united states. [applause] >> jim gray has been nominated. >> and scotty bowman from michigan and i nominate lee wrights or vice-president of the united states libertarian nomination. [applause] >> i nominate jim burns for vice-president of the united states. >> jim burns has been nominated. further nominations from the floor? seeing none, i will close -- sorry, i see one more. >> i am mary o'connor from minnesota. i nominate sam sloan for vice- president. >> i am sorry, i have been informed by his secretary that he is not eligible. further nominations? >> i nominate jim gray for vice- president. >> he was already nominated. if you like to nominate someone please come to the microphone. >> i have been informed that nominations are supposed to be in writing, so those who have done the nominating, there are three names that the secretary is already in possession of. the go-ahead and state your nomination, but submitted to the secretary. >> i am from the great state of florida. and nominate -- i nominate nota, none of the above. >> another seconding for jim byrnes. >> se
the gaithersburg book festival we hear from david stew wetter on the third vice president of the united states. his called everyone emperor. he he's introduced by john ashman the founder of the gaithersburg book festival. >> surveys are available at the tend. we hope you enjoy the rest of of your day at the festival. [inaudible conversations] good afternoon, everyone. welcome to the third annual gaithersburg book festival. i'm judd ashman a member of the city council. oop. i hope everyone is all right over there. [inaudible conversations] it is a i have i vibrant diversity that celebrates the support of the cultural arts. we're pleased to bring the event free of charge thanks to the generous support of our sponsors. for our consideration and everyone here, i should say, please silence any devices that make any kind of noise at all. in order keep improving the event. we want your feedback. please grab a survey from the table over here. from the info booth it'll be up on the website as of later today. please help us keep improving the event. if there's time for qa please come to the microphone with t
might appear to suggest trading large areas of europe for war with the united states may be hard going. at the ambassadorial group in washington, secretary general sticker confirmed this was not a needle-steering group and the council had not given it any power. a number of nations expressed strong dissatisfaction about the lack of information they were receiving about berlin planning, about the ambassadorial group giving instructions and about the way that the allied powers were presenting papers to nato committees on a take it or leave it basis. the canadian ambassador said if the allies are to be committed in war, they should be informed in peace. the belgian ambassador added, since they're all in danger of war, they should all take part in the planning. the four powers responded quickly to this strong sense of dissatisfaction in the nato council. on september 27th, they provided a full report on live oak plans and secretary general also presented the ambassadors with these new suggested instructions to nato military authorities, which he helped to draft. the instructions stated, if
. may god bless our men and women in uniform, and may god bless the united states of america. [applause] >> think you very much, mr. president. -- think you very much. there is a tradition of the wall with a new name is red, it is honored. 10 new names were added to the wall. we ask families of these heroes to rise as their loved ones are red. -- are read. albert corava. [applause] joseph william albit. richard carld hunt. [applause] richard dwayne stalker. [applause] david mcqueen disowitz. walter allan grensy. frank a. miery. david lawrence deckerd. [applause] larry morgan kelly. [applause] johnny owen brooks. [applause] now there is the names of 58,282 heroes. ladies and gentlemen, please live at -- please rise as the president, first lady and other distinguished leaders take their place at the wall with the a place at a solid who represent not only loved ones, but all who served, suffered, it sacrifice in the name of freedom. joining the president and first lady is mrs. rose marie saber brown, wife of the medal of honor winner. joining the vice-president of the united states, joe bi
, in 1961, the cuban constitution was identical to that of the united states. those words in that constitution did not protect us. words do not protect you. understanding and be leaving in the words do. -- and believing in the words do. we today have a serious problem in that regard. the "new york times" three weeks ago -- "time" magazine three weeks ago reported as a cover story how the constitution is under siege, and "newsweek" about two months ago had a cover story about the failure of americans to understand our government. some very scary statistics. two out of every three graduating high-school students today believe that the three branches of government are republican, democrat, and independent. that is an actual poll. 75% of all americans don't know that religious freedom is protected by the first amendment. 75%. more americans can name the judges on "american idol" than on the supreme court of the united states. what does this mean to us? how did we get here? well, first of all, unless the next generation understands the obligations imposed by the constitution, w
of real significance to the united states. to do that, we will dedicate 80% of our effort to four major cases. right now they are syria, kenya, north/central america and burma. then we'll have another eight to ten places where we can test new approaches or make a welcome difference by just sending the the right person at the right time. so far i think we're gaining traction in each of our major priority engagements. many of you are working in these places, and we realize that we won't know it all or know best about them, so we hope for your support. in syria we are providing a nontraditional surge to empower and unite a fractured, nonviolent opposition. as the secretary announced, that includes providing nonlethal assistance. we are also working with partners to set up an outpost for the internal opposition to coordinate and communicate with the international community. in kenya we are helping to develop plans to insure peaceful and credible elections a year before the vote. incidentally, kenya is one place where we've seen a potential model for broad cooperation and innovation. in nort
in the history of trade and taxation in the united states and is the author of several scholarly works, 19th and 20th tariff policy. long a civil war buff, his attention turned to the presidency of abraham lincoln after a fortuitous discovery at library of congress. the find marked the beginning of a four year hunt for documents culminating in his book, co-authored with sebastian page, lincoln and the movement for black resettlement. in addition to writing, dr. magnus is an academic programs director at the institute for humane studies at george mason university, also taught in public administration at american university, and international tragtional trade . also in his biography, something i find fascinating. he is an avid scuba diver. and plays underwater hockey. for the washington, d.c., and i love this name -- beltway bottom feeders. there is probably no end of applicants for that team. after dr. magnus makes his presentation, rodney ross will come to read a poem of -- of john willis menard that is very appropriate. actually there are copies, print copies of it on the table outside. rod
. as the president said, preventing a nuclear iran is in the interest of the united states. we have issued reports, and the most recent one was issued on and.ary 1 and it includes a distinguished panel of four democratic members of congress, admirals' and generals and also experts to area our last report supported the view that the best approached to this challenge is a simultaneous pursuit of a triple track policy, which is of diplomacy, tough sanctions, and a credible and invisible military threat. we also issued a white paper on each of those tracks. i want to highlight one recommendation on each of those tracks, and then i will change it over to mort zuckerman. and the military threat we believe the united states should boost the credibility of its military to air around us nuclear facilities, and we have spelled out how to do so. one element has been selling bunker busters' to israel. we do not advocate an israeli strike, but this will send a strong signal to tehran to negotiate in good faith, encourage other states that the alternative to supporting u.s. sanctions could be military conflict
geopolitics -- host: oil and gas production in the western hemisphere is booming, with the united states emerging less dependent on supplies from an unstable middle east. vens, nigeria, and mexico. host: southeast michigan. what are gas prices like there, dave? caller: very good. someone saying on your show that prices were falling for the holidays. that's not true here in southeast michigan, which people here like to drive a lot up north. we have a wonderful, beautiful up north. but the prices here average in the low $3.90's. they were a week ago in the mid $3.60, around there. for my employees, it's all the same for them. we're traveling 60 mile an hour round trips and that really hits the pocketbook when you're having to travel every day for week. i'll companies are certainly quick to bring the price down. thanks and have a good holiday. host: it's not our oil that we're talking about, it belongs to oil companies. new hampshire, john on our democrats line joins us. hi. caller: just one note i've acknowledged over the last few weeks. we have a caller on your show, but he was discussing
disruptive not only in a conflict can be destructive to the united states but other countries as well and that is one of the things about military operations in cyberspace with cascading effect that are hard to predict. we have concerns about this and this is why we created joint military platforms like a strategic security dialogue to talk about issues that we feel our potential for friction in the u.s./china relationship. cyber is one of those areas. we don't talk about space, nuclear and missile defense areas as part of the strategic dialogue. >> you mentioned last year spending was almost double what the public acknowledgment was. what things will you give us as examples that they are spending on this year? you did not speculate on the number but what they are spending on this year but not publicly acknowledged? >> we think their nuclear force modernization occurs and research and development money that goes through their defense industry we also think is from a different budget, a different account. some foreign acquisitions come from a different account as well and some local co
important basic research projects in american history underway in the united states. tim was the founding director of that project. after his service on that project and continuing to publish other acclaimed books, he now actually holds his job as the collector of the richard nixon library out in california. as the director of the nixon library, tim has not only been organizing world history projects of his own, he's actually set precedents in almost setting the model of how to run a presidential library under the most difficult possible circumstances. it's a tribute to his abilities. then to tim's right, your left is bob strong. i know bob strong principally through his scholarship. bob works in that strange netherworld where you study american politics by understanding its political history. some days he looks like a political historian and could be an exemplar of both. i think he's probably the single most prominent and important historian of the carter presidency to publish so far. his work on carter's foreign policy is today the standard work that any scholar looking at that must rea
-2012 there will be no war, no deal. this is a to 13 problem. and ultimately it will be a problem with the united states fundamentally is going to have to wrestle with. syria, the situation there will continue until two things occur. number one, the russians can be dissuaded from their policy of backing -- and there would be some fundamental change on the ground. right now you don't even have a hurting stalemate. you have a situation where the regime still controls the issuance of state power. the opposition will not break but neither can it cause the regime to break. now what to do about this. this of course is the great co-none drum. what do we do? here again i am a believer. in the united states determines that it is in its vital national interest to remove this regime, then it should act comprehensively and decisively in an effort to do it. if it does not believe it it is in the vital national interest to resume it and in my judgment it is not a vital national interest, we should stay out and certainly not adopt the kind of half-baked ill advised, half measures that will get us into a military commi
. this is a bill for the entire united states of america. it's a bill for the taxpayers, for heavens sake. so senator tester, thank you for your leadership and that of senator vitter and i appreciate senator moran coming on to -- i don't have questions because the questions i would have asked had been asked while i was listening, but thank you very much. let's keep this you and let's redouble our resolve to actually get an accomplishment for the taxpayers and for the american public. >> well, thank you, senator -- >> live now on capitol hill this morning where the senate health committee and senate subcommittee on primary health and ageing is holding a hearing on the cost of hiv/aids drugs. senator bernie sanders has introduced a bill to shorten the time before generics can be made of those drugs. it includes an annual $3 billion prize for hiv/aids drug research. testifying this morning nobel laureate economist joseph stiglitz, harvard law professor lawrence less ig and a number of public health figures. vermont senator bernie sanders is chairing this hearing. he's in the room. this is about
in two decades, we're looking at what it means for the united states. i'm wolf blitzer, you're still in "the situation room." the vice president joe biden said over the weekend he's fine with gay marriage and arnie duncan says he believes gay and lesbians should be allowed to marry. putting him at odds with the president of the united states. jessica yellin is working the story for us. jessica, causing quite an uproar there, what's going on? >> reporter: this is clearly an unwelcome topic for a white house that pronounces to make all decisions based on principle not on politics. it certainly looks as if the vice president supports gay marriage. >> who do you love? the president sets the policy. i am absolutely comfortable that the fact that men marrying wo i and women marrying women, are entitled to all the civil rights and the civil liberties. >> reporter: but the president is vague. >> my feelings about this are constantly evolving. i struggle with this. >> reporter: this is a flash point election. to argue biden's comments weren't new. >> i think they were entirely consistent with
the veto word is not used, also not used in the constitution of the united states but no one doubts the president has it. we have the ability to do it to the language that is there. that will become a bit more clear as we come forward. >> thank you, chairman kerry. i'm very glad that we're having this in today and i appreciate all of you for being here. senator webb and i sent chairman kerry and ranking member luber a letter back in april urging we move forward to consideration of law of the sea treaty and i'm grateful to your broad and searching and supportive testimony here today. when i was brand-new to the senate, one of the earlier meetings i took was with the then outgoing chief of naval operations. when i asked him what is the single most important thing we can do to help the navy over the next decade, he said without hesitation, ratify the law of the sea treaty. i was taken aback by the. given other budget priorities, operational issues, as it turned out admiral estimation of the importance of this issue is shared i'm stomach every living chief of naval operations not to men
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